I watched a boy get saved by lifeguards the other day. It was a vacation day in Mexico, we were sitting on the wall behind the resort’s pool and overlooking the beach. We were watching a volleyball game and the jet skies while trying to decide if the sea was too rough to parasail (it was very rough and bouncing around in the little boat seemed like a bad idea).

Suddenly and quietly, the lifeguard jumped out of his tower to our left and took off, attaching that floaty thing to himself as he sprinted across the beach to the resort property next to ours.

“I wonder what he sees that we don’t?” said Teresa and quickly we saw what it was. Despite the red flags, some Mexican families had gone out further than they should have and several were swimming hard but getting nowhere. Others were frantically gesturing to a boy who was clearly struggling. Our resorts lifeguard was the second on scene and he began clearing swimmers from the floating rope between the properties so the first lifeguard could drag the kid there for support. He got to the kid, had him grab the rope and also got the struggling swimmers to safety. Everyone waded in holding the rope and oxygen was given to the boy, probably as a precaution.

And just like that, it was over. The people behind us went on drinking in the pool unaware and the volleyball game continued unabated. There was no dramatic music, no medals were awarded, life just went on, the Caribbean spitting back a victim it could just as easily have swallowed. The boy and his family will always remember the day, I might, and I know the lifeguards will sleep better knowing they pulled a kid out of the water. A kid that will live to grow up, unlike the ones who simply went to a movie and didn’t get home. He probably won’t be scarred for life like those who were subject to a madman football coach and his enabling university. He got some help, he got lucky, he received grace on this day.

There is a narrow line in the beach sand between making it through the day and not. Thank God, for this little boy at least, life will go on a while longer.

Namaste.

3 Responses to A Thin Line

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I watched a boy get saved by lifeguards the other day. It was a vacation day in Mexico, we were sitting on the wall behind the resort’s pool and overlooking the beach. We were watching a volleyball game and the jet skies while trying to decide if the sea was too rough to parasail (it was very rough and bouncing around in the little boat seemed like a bad idea).

Suddenly and quietly, the lifeguard jumped out of his tower to our left and took off, attaching that floaty thing to himself as he sprinted across the beach to the resort property next to ours.

“I wonder what he sees that we don’t?” said Teresa and quickly we saw what it was. Despite the red flags, some Mexican families had gone out further than they should have and several were swimming hard but getting nowhere. Others were frantically gesturing to a boy who was clearly struggling. Our resorts lifeguard was the second on scene and he began clearing swimmers from the floating rope between the properties so the first lifeguard could drag the kid there for support. He got to the kid, had him grab the rope and also got the struggling swimmers to safety. Everyone waded in holding the rope and oxygen was given to the boy, probably as a precaution.

And just like that, it was over. The people behind us went on drinking in the pool unaware and the volleyball game continued unabated. There was no dramatic music, no medals were awarded, life just went on, the Caribbean spitting back a victim it could just as easily have swallowed. The boy and his family will always remember the day, I might, and I know the lifeguards will sleep better knowing they pulled a kid out of the water. A kid that will live to grow up, unlike the ones who simply went to a movie and didn’t get home. He probably won’t be scarred for life like those who were subject to a madman football coach and his enabling university. He got some help, he got lucky, he received grace on this day.

There is a narrow line in the beach sand between making it through the day and not. Thank God, for this little boy at least, life will go on a while longer.

Namaste.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>